Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Senator Bob Corker is lone defector joining Dems to advance minimum wage

I have been pleased with Senator Corker's leadership in calling for a more robust response to Russian aggression in the Ukraine and I have often been pleased with Senator Corker's leadership on other important issues,  but yesterday I was extremely disappointed when Corker joined Democrats in voting to advance a bill to increase the minimum wage (link). 

Sen. Bob Corker
We know that hiking minimum wage cuts off the bottom rung of the economic ladder. It eliminates the starter jobs that give people experience and entry into the labor market. Some of those jobs that are only worth $7.25 an hour and will simply disappear at $10.10 an hour. Fast food establishments could replace people with self service ordering machines where you punch in your own order and swipe your credit card and they could eliminate a position or two. And who knows, machines might be smarter, faster, make less mistakes, and be more polite.

There are fewer check-out people at the grocery store now and there are more self service check-out machines than there used to be and full service gas stations have disappeared and there are no longer boys who push your grocery cart to your car and put the groceries in the trunk for you. More of those check-out grocery store clerk jobs could disappear and there are a lot of other jobs that could also disappear if the job must pay more than what it is worth. It is not complicated. It is simple economics. It is the simplest supply and demand curve.  I don't expect Democrats to be persuaded by reason and to be rational but I expect it of Republicans. Belief in a market economy is one thing that should separate Republicans from Democrats. 

Sen. Lamar Alexander
I am pleased with Lamar Alexander for his strong stand on the minimum wage.  He not only voted with his Party yesterday, but in the past Alexander has gone farther than most Republicans and has correctly taken the view that we should completely abolish the minimum wage (link). Yesterday Sen. Lamar Alexander called the wage increase a "stale, bankrupt" idea that could cost jobs, and cited a number of GOP-backed proposals that he says will do more to create jobs, such as reforming federal job training programs, building the Keystone XL oil pipeline, approving new trade pacts, and others.  "The issue is right—it's jobs. The American people want it to be easier to find a good-paying job," said Alexander (link).

The vote to advance the bill was 54 to 42. It would have taken 60 votes to advance the bill. After the vote, Corker said that he would have voted against the bill if the issue would have came to a vote, but he voted to advance the bill because the thought it ought to be debated. That is lame. If it would have come to a vote, the Democrats had the votes to pass it in the Senate. Thankfully, the House will not pass the bill. 


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Mayor Dean's Budget Presentation to the Metro Council for Fiscal Year 2015

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Mayor Dean's vision includes more pre-K $, metro benefits for same-sex couples, new Office of Public Guardian

Channel 2 photo
Mayor Karl Dean presented his "State of Metro address today and called for the following:
  • New funding for pre-k.
  • Creation of a new Office of Public Guardian to defend the elderly and others unable to handle their own affairs. 
  • Extend Metro health insurance and other benefits to same sex couples.
  • More for mass transit.
Below are news reports:


by Michael Cass, The Tennessean, April 30, 2014 - Mayor Karl Dean laid out a broad vision for Nashville’s future Wednesday, calling for new funding for preschool, transit and care for the elderly and domestic violence prevention in his “State of Metro” address at the Rolling Mill Hills Greenway Overlook.  (link)


News Channel 2, NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Education and mass transit were Nashville Mayor Karl Dean’s top priorities in his seventh State of Metro Address delivered Wednesday morning from the Rolling Mill Hill Greenway overlooking downtown Nashville. The mayor’s proposed spending plan includes $27.5 million in new funding for Metro Schools to, in part, fund Dr. Jesse Register’s plan to expand pre-K.

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Jeff Yarbro has the money in District 21 race. In 17, Challenger Clark Boyd leads Beavers

The below is from Tom Humphrey's blog and reports cash on hand at the end of the first quarter 2014. Where a challenger has filed no report, it’s usually due to the candidate qualifying after April 1 or failure to raise or spend $1,000, the threshold for filing a report.

Sen. District 21 (open, Sen. Douglas Henry, D-Nashville, retiring): In Democratic primary, Mary Mancini, $61,281.74; Jeff Yarbro, $212,711.69. In Republican primary, no reports filed by any of the three candidates – Mwafaq Aljabbary, Diana Cuellar and Quincy McKnight.
Senate District 17: Sen. Mae Beavers, R-Mount Juliet, $55,541.64; Clark Boyd, $65,825.23.

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Bellevue Republican Breakfast Clut to host Senate District 21 candidates

From Bellevue Republican Breakfast Club:

Dear BRBC Friends,

Our monthly meeting of the breakfast club will be this Saturday, May 3 at 8 AM at the Shoney's Restaurant on Hwy 70. Since this is an election year, we will be showcasing some of the candidates. This month we will have Diana Cuellar, Quincy McKnight and Mwafaq Aljabbary. These folks will be running for the open Senate District 21 seat.

Also, John Wang who is running for a House seat will also be speaking. Come and hear about why they are running. There will be time for Q and A after their presentation. Hope to see you there!

Betty

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32% of Tennesseans would like to move away

In a recent Gallup poll, 32% of Tennesseans say they would like to move away.  That seems like a lot. I did not know so many people were so discontented. However, 33% of all Americans would like to leave the state in which they live.  Nowhere is the desire to move greater than it is in Illinois and Connecticut. In both of these states, about half of residents say that if given the chance to move to a different state, they would like to do so. Maryland is a close third, at 47%.  By contrast, in Montana, Hawaii, and Maine, just 23% say they would like to relocate.  Almost as content at just 24% are residents of  Oregon, New Hampshire, and Texas. To see the full report follow this link.

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Tuesday, April 29, 2014

A Reception of John Wang

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