Monday, February 19, 2018

Rick Williams featured on Channel 5 news calling for Megan Barry's resignation

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‘Resign Now! Megan Barry’ Rally Set for Tomorrow at Metro Nashville Courthouse


A rally calling on Mayor Megan Barry to resign “effective immediately” will take place tomorrow, Tuesday, February 20, at 5 p.m., on the south side steps of the Metro Nashville Davidson Courthouse.

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Sunday, February 18, 2018

The best defense of the second amendment and agruement agaisnt gun control I have ever heard.




Rod Williams's Comment: I agree with the statement of Richard Upchurch above. This is one of the clearest arguments I have ever heard explaining why we must protect the right to bear arms. I also think he frames the argument well in replying to those who want to impose gun control. Why do they never propose repealing the Second Amendment? Why? Why do those who want to impose gun control  not come out and clearly say it is time to repeal the Second Amendment?

What they want to do is ignore it; not repeal it. If that can happen then none of our liberties are secure. If we can take away the right to bear arms by ignoring the Second Amendment, we can take away freedom of the press little by little, not by repealing the First Amendment but by ignoring it and rationalizing that it is antiquated and that "hate speech" must be prohibited. After all, when the First Amendment was written there were no blogs or Facebook or TV or radio.  If the Second Amendment can be ignored due to public opinion and public opinion turns against the right to bear arms, then all of our liberties can depend on the public opinion of the moment.

For those who might be wondering, this speech is not really delivered before Congress but is a segment of Bill Whittle's Virtual State of the Union address.

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What's on the Council agenda for 2/20/18: Not much, nothing likely to generate controversy and nothing of much importance.

By Rod Williams - The Metro Council will meet Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 6:30 PM in the Council chamber at the Metro Courthouse.  If you are going to watch the Council meeting, you need a copy of the Council agenda and the staff analysis  or you really will not know what is going on. You can get the agenda and analysis at the highlighted links. If you normally watch the Council meeting but want to skip a meeting, this is a meeting to skip.  I see nothing on the agenda likely to generate controversy and nothing of very much importance. 

 There are 15 resolution on the agenda and all are on the consent agenda at this time. A resolution stays on the consent agenda if it passes  unanimously the committees to which it was assigned. Resolutions which receive negative votes in committee are pulled off of consent. Also any councilman may have a resolution pulled off of consent. Those remaining on consent are lumped together and passed by a single vote. Resolutions on the consent agenda are usually not controversial and tend to be routine matters, such as accepting grants from the Federal or State Government, entering into inter agency agreements over mundane things, appropriating money from the 4% fund, settling lawsuits, or approving signs overhanging the sidewalk. Unlike a bill which requires three votes of the Council to pass, a resolution only requires one vote of the Council. None of the resolutions on this agenda are of significant interest.

I do not read bills on First Reading. First reading is a formality that gets bills on the agenda. Except on very rare occasions, all bills on First Reading are lumped together and pass by a single vote.

There are 21 bills on second reading most of which are "acquisition of certain right-of-way easements, drainage easements, temporary construction easements and property rights by negotiation or condemnation for use in public projects of the Metropolitan Government." This is for sidewalk construction.

Below are other items of interest:

Bill BL2018-1063  on second reading is a bill to "require the Procurement Division to collect comprehensive data regarding the participation of subcontractors in the procurement process."  Currently, the Minority and Women Business Assistance Office (BAO) is authorized to collect information to monitor the Procurement Nondiscrimination Program. The information “may” include information regarding business ownership, supplier information, and subcontractor information. This changes the "may" to "shall."  In the past and probably still, I know this program is often abused. Sometimes a White contractor and a Black subcontractor may switch rolls to get an advantage as a minority-owned firm. The White guy may agree to be the subcontractor to the Black guy. Also, I have known of instances years ago, where a man would make his wife the owner of their family-owned construction company in order to gain and advantage as a women-owned business. I don't know if this would reveal those manipulations are not, but it may.

Bill BL2018-1055 on third reading would protect General Hospital from being downgraded to an out patient facility only and would provide that  until June 30, 2019 the mayor may not terminate any agreement between Metro and the Metro Hospital Authority without prior approval of the Metro Council by resolution.This is very disappointing. I am very disappointing to see that Councilman Steve Glover is one of the sponsors of this bill.  Metro General is a money pit that cannot fill its beds and serves no purpose that could not be served at a much lower cost and is only kept open because it is source of pride in the Black community. Earlier this year, Mayor Barry had a proposal to close General and convert it into an outpatient clinic but got push back and buckled to pressure and dropped the proposal.

Bill BL2017-1026  on third reading is a zoning bill sponsored by Scott Davis, disapproved by the Planning Commission. I know nothing about the merits of this rezoning and am only calling attention to this bill because it is a disapproved bill and will require 27 votes to pass.

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Saturday, February 17, 2018

Dave Chappelle understands trade better than Donald Trump



In a recent comedy routine, Dave Chappelle summarized President Trump’s position on trade relations with China by saying, “I’m gonna go to China, and I’m gonna get these jobs from China and bring ‘em back to America.” Chappelle then replied, “For what, so iPhones can be $9,000? Leave that job in China where it belongs … I wanna wear Nikes, I don’t wanna make those things. Stop trying to give us Chinese jobs.” Dave Chappelle gets it.

While initially being a "never Trumper," I have warmed to Trump. His appointment of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court and his appointees of other conservatives to the judiciary, the passage of pro-growth tax cuts, the defeat of ISIS, and his slashing of Obama era regulations are the accomplishments which are at the forefront of my reason for warming to Trump. I still have reservations about Trump, however. His demeanor and his lack of ideological commitment to conservative orthodoxy concerns me. While I am beginning to think that Trump's anti-trade rhetoric may be more posturing than real and while I am pleased that he has not started an international trade war, it is dangerous however to spread ignorance about the benefits of trade.

While I am supportive of combating currency manipulators and theft of intellectual property, the benefits of trade should not be ignored and trade should not be demonized. I do not want to grow my own food, and make my own shoes, and build my own house, and make my own car. Trade increases one's standard of living. The same principle that applies to trade in general, also, applies to international trade. If we are better at marketing a product, financing a product, delivering a product and retailing a product than making the product, let people in some other country make it and we will do the rest. To require than products be American-made may cost more jobs than it saves. As an example, if we say all steel used in construction of an American oil pipeline must be made in America, we may be able to build fewer pipelines due to the higher cost of American steel than we could if we imported steel. The few jobs saved by insisted on "American-made" may be fewer than the jobs lost due to the higher construction cost.

A bad thing that has resulted from Trump's anti-trade rhetoric is that many people who think of themselves as conservatives now process an anti-trade mentality.  On the other hand, a good thing resulting from Trump's anti-trade rhetoric is that Democrats, who were the party captured by unionist who always take a  knee-jerk anti-trade position, are so anti-Trump that they now are pro-free trade. Maybe, on balance, the cause of free-trade comes out ahead. In any event it is reassuring to hear a popular figure like Dave Chappelle explain the benefits of free-trade. 

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Fincher drops out of Senate race

The Tennessean: Stephen Fincher halts U.S. Senate bid, encourages Corker to seek re-election.

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Friday, February 16, 2018

Mayor Barry's lover earned $173,843.13 in overtime

The Tennessean: Mayor Megan Barry's ex-bodyguard received thousands more in overtime pay than other security.

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"Megan, a mistake is having a one-night sexual encounter for which you then feel guilty the next day. A two-year affair is not a mistake."

"Megan, a mistake is having a one-night sexual encounter for which you then feel guilty the next day. A two-year affair is not a mistake."

Patricia Dillon, Nashville Tn, The Tennessean, Letters to the Editor

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Thursday, February 15, 2018

1st Tuesday featuring former TN Congressman Stephen Fincher, Candidate for US Senate

Tuesday, March 6th at Waller Law, 511 Union Street, Nashville

Stephen Fincher, former TN Congressman from the 8th District who hails from Frog Jump, TN and has ''hopped in'' to the primary the Senate primary to replace the retiring Senator Bob Corker will be our Guest ! Since entering the race, Stephen has been proven he can marshal the significant funds needed to compete in a statewide primary.

Doors open at 11am, Lunch begins at 11:30. Program starts at Noon sharp with Q&A session ending promptly at 1pm. Chairman Golden will give behind the scenes insights into the upcoming elections.

$20 for 2017 Members and $25 for Guests. More info and register here. [Remember: parking under building at 511 Union St is only $7 for 2 hours if you tell them you've been to 1ST TUESDAY!]

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Nashville Young Republicans meeting, Tuesday, Feb. 27th.


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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Mayor Barry warns of 'fiscal challenges' for next city budget. Does this sound like a good time to increase Nashville's sales tax to the highest in the nation?

These are the "challenges:"

  • Fund balances for each of the six tax funds are at or are projected to be below policy targets at the end of fiscal year 2017-2018 and those fund balance reserves must be increased; 
  • Escalating health care costs combined with the Tennessee General Assembly not acting to expand Medicaid; 
  • Property tax appeals following last year’s reappraisal far exceeded the level of appeals after the last two reappraisals, and the full impact to revenues will not be known until the end of this fiscal year;
  • There will be further reductions in revenue from the state Hall tax on certain investment income, which the state legislature has voted phase out; 
  • After a couple of years of acceleration, revenue growth in the six tax funds is returning to normal levels; Increased debt service requirements
Does this sound like a good time to increase Nashville's sales tax to the highest in the nation?  Does this seem like a good time to take on $8.9 Billion in debt? While Nashville is a hot convention destination, once conventions visit Nashville once, they may visit Nashville less in future years as an increase in the Sales Tax, the Hotel-Motel Tax and the car rental tax makes Nashville an expensive convention city. Las Vegas might look more attractive.

This year, I am not going to be surprised at all if Mayor Barry proposes a property tax increase. If so it needs to be resisted and instead the city needs to cut waste including closing General Hospital.

The next time the city goes after bringing a business like Amazon to town and wants to "incentivize" them for coming hear, ask "why?' I for one, don't want more growth. I do not understand the fetish for getting bigger and bigger. Growth does not pay for itself. Bigger cities are more expensive cities with higher tax burdens, and less affordable housing and more traffic congestion.  I am please that we have grown over the years, but there is an optimal size and I think we passed it about three years ago. 



So, reject the tax for tracks plan, stop corporate welfare to attract new companies coming to town, close General Hospital, actually build some sidewalks but stop wasting millions on thinking about it, tighten our belts, restore the reserve funds, put up the not welcome sign and pull up the draw bridge. 

To read The Tennessean story, follow this link.

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Who voted for transparency and who voted to conceal the $8.9 price tag of the tax for tracks plan

On February 6,  the Metro Council voted to approve Mayor Barry's transit improvement program (Bill BL2017-1031 (as amended)), or as it is better known, "tax for tracks"  Included in the bill was a request for the Davidson County Election Commission to call a county-wide referendum regarding the increase in taxes to fund the plan.

In debating the bill some members made the argument that they were simply passing the bill to let the public decide the issue.  That is not the way it works. That is a weak rationalization for not having the guts to vote against it. That is like a member of the Senate voting for a bill and claiming he is voting to let the House of Representatives decide. Or, it is like a councilman voting to pass a bill in the Council and saying he is voting for it and the mayor can decide to sign it or not. As the minutes describe the bill it is , "An ordinance adopting a transit improvement program for the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, approving a surcharge for the program, and requesting the Davidson County Election Commission to call a county-wide referendum election to be held on May 1, 2018, regarding the levying of the surcharge on certain taxes to fund the program." For more proof, read the bill. This was a vote by the Council to approve the plan and to approve the tax increase.

Originally the bill required language in the referendum to state that the cost of the program would be $5.3 billion. On the night of final passage, the bill was amended to reflect the true cost of $8.5 billion. This of course assumes no cost overruns and historically projects of this nature rarely come in on budgets. Cost overruns of 50% to 200% are not uncommon for projects like this. Following the amendment adoption, the following language is what will be in the referendum:

This transit program’s capital cost is estimated to have a present day value of $5,354,000,000 and the program is estimated to require $8,951,062,000 in revenue through 2032. Once construction is complete, the estimated present day value of recurring annual operating and maintenance costs is approximately $99,500,000.
The amendment to include the transparent language that reveals the $8.9 Billion price tag was hotly debated. It passed by a vote of YES: 21, NO: 16, ABSTAIN: 1 and NOT VOTING: 1

A "yes" vote on Amendment 2 was a vote for transparency. It was a vote to include the $8. 95 million plan price tag.


Here is a list of those who voted for the transparency amendment.
John Cooper, At-large           Erica Gilmore, At-large               Bob Mendes, At-Large
Sharon Hurt, At-large            Jim Shulman, At-large                DeCosta Hastings, District 2  
Brenda Haywood, District 3   Robert Swope, District 4            Doug Pardue, District 10    
Larry Hagar,  District 11         Steve Glover, District 12           Holly Huezo, District 13           
Keven Rhoten, District 14      Freddie O'Connell, District 19   Mary Carolyn Roberts, District 20
Sheri Weiner, District 22         Mina Johnson, District 26          Tanaka Vercher, District 29      
Jacobia Dowell, District 33     Angie Henderson, District 34     Dave Rosenberg District 35  

Here  is a list of those who voted against transparency, voting to hide the $8.9 Million price tag.

Scott Davis District 5,                    Bret Witters, District 6        Anthony Davis, District 7
Nancy VanReece, District 8           Bill Pridemore District 9      Jeff Syracuse, District 15


Mike Freeman, District 16              Colby Sledge, District 17     Burkley Allen, District 18
Kathleen Murphy, District 24          Russ Pulley. District 25       Jeremy Elrod, District 26
Karen Johnson, District 29            Jason Potts, District 30       Fabain Bedne, District 32
Antoinette Lee, District 33

Abstaining was Davette Blalock, District 27 and not voting was Ed Kindall, District 2

How they voted on the final bill
After the bill was amended to make it more transparent, it was then voted upon. In the final vote every member of the Council voted for it except for Robert Swope and Holly Huezo who voted "No" and Angie Henderson and Dave Rosenberg who abstained.

If you are unsure who your councilman is, you can use the look-up tool at this link.  Also, if you would like to put a face with the name, you can see what your councilman looks at at that link and you can contact them from that page should you wish to communicate with your council member.

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SURVEY: Record number of small business owners say 'now is a good time to expand'

Press release, NASHVILLE, Feb. 13, 2018–The Small Business Optimism Index jumped two points to 106.9 in January and set a record with the number of small business owners saying Now Is a Good Time to Expand, according to NFIB’s Small Business Economic Trends Survey, released today.

“Main Street is roaring,” said NFIB President and CEO Juanita Duggan. “Small business owners are not only reporting better profits, but they’re also ready to grow and expand. The record level of enthusiasm for expansion follows a year of record-breaking optimism among small businesses.”

State-specific data is unavailable, but NFIB State Director Jim Brown said the national trends are reflected here.

On the survey, "Now Is a Good Time to Expand" registered at 32 percent, the highest level in the history of the NFIB survey, which began in 1973. "Actual Earnings" climbed up 11 points from December, the highest level reported since 1988. "Plans to make Capital Outlays" jumped up two points, and "Plans to Increase Inventories" gained four points.

“The historically high index readings over the last year tell us small business owners have never been more positive about the economy,” said NFIB Chief Economist Bill Dunkelberg. “This is in large response to the new management in Washington tackling the biggest concerns of small business owners – high taxes and regulations.”

As small business owners struggle to find qualified workers for open positions, reports of higher worker compensation rose four percentage points to a net 31 percent, the highest reading since 2000 and among the highest in the 45 years of NFIB’s survey. Plans to raise compensation also rose one point to a net 24 percent, the highest reading since 1989.  

“Finding qualified workers now exceeds taxes and regulations as the top concern for small businesses,” said Duggan.

Click here to view the NFIB Small Business Economic Trends Survey For more information about NFIB, please visit www.nfib.com.

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Monday, February 12, 2018

Vice mayor appoints members of special committee to investigate Mayor Barry

Erica Gillmore
At-large
Bob Mendes
At-large

The Vice Mayor has named council members to the committee tasked with investigating Mayor Megan Barry. The committee will consist of at-large council members  Erica Gilmore and Bob Mendes and district
council members Brenda Haywood, Burkley Allen, Mina Johnson, Russ Pulley and Robert Swope.

Brenda Haywood
District 3
Robert Swope
District 4
;

Russ Pulley
District 25
The Council voted on Feb. 6th to investigate the Mayor Barry scandal involving misuse of public funds to facilitate a sexual relationship with a subordinate. The vote was  30 "yes," 7 "no", and no abstentions and none not voting (link).  Of those appointed to the committee, Russ Pulley and Burkley Allen are two of the seven who voted against the investigation. The others voted in favor of the investigation.

To read The Tennessean's report on this development, follow this link.
WSMV coverage is at this link.
Mina Johnson
District 23

Burkley Allen
District 18



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Vote now in WKRN news 2 poll. Should Mayor Barry resign?

News 2 wants to know… Is resigning the right thing for Mayor Barry to do?  Vote in our poll below or click here to vote from the News 2 app. Be sure to click ‘Continue Reading’ to cast your vote.

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Sunday, February 11, 2018

Black pastors join the opposition to Mayor Barry's tax for tracks plan

Nashville Business Journal- Nashville's transit opposition has some new backers.

Rev. Enoch Fuzz, of Corinthian Missionary Baptist Church, and Rev. Herbert Lester, of Clark Memorial United Methodist Church, have come out in support of NoTax4Tracks, the high-powered opposition to Mayor Megan Barry's multibillion-dollar mass-transit overhaul. (link)

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Saturday, February 10, 2018

Which Council members voted for and which voted against investigating Mayor Barry

On February 6th the Council passes Resolution RS2018-1039, a resolution to establish a Special Committee to investigate the circumstances surrounding  Mayor Barry's sexual affair with a subordinate and to look into travel and other expenses, including overtime expenses to determine if there was an improper use of public money.

Council Member Vercher requested a suspension of the rules to allow the resolution to be heard and no objections were made. After some discussion the resolution passed. The vote was 30 "yes," 7 "no", and no abstentions and none not voting.


Here are the Council members who voted in favor of an investigation
John Cooper, At-large           Eric Gilmore, At-Large Mendes                   Sharon Hurt, At-Large
Jim Shulman, At-large            DeCosta Hastings, District 1                        Brenda Haywood, District 2
Robert Swope, District 4        Scott Davis, District 5                                   Doug Pardue, District 10
Larry Hagar, District 11          Steve Glover, District 12                              Holly Huezo, District 13
Keven Rhoten, District 14       Jeff Syracuse, District 15                             Mike Freeman, District 16
Colby Sledge, District 17        Freedie O'Connell, District 19           Mary Carolyn Roberts, District 20
Sheri Weiner, District 22         Mina Johnson, District 23                         Kathleen Murphy, District 24
Jeremy Elrod, District 26         Davette Blalock, District 27                     Tanaka Vercher, District 28
Karen Johnson, District 29      Jason Potts, District 30                              Jacobia Dowell, District 32
Angie Henderson, District 34   Dave Rosenberg, District 35

These are the Council members who voted against an investigation
Bret Withers, District 6            Anthony Davis, District 7                          Nancy VanReece, District 8
Bill Pridemore, District 9         Burkely Allen, District 18                          Russ Pulley, District 25                                      Fabian Bedne, District 31

If you are unsure who is your council member, you can use this look-up tool at this link. In looking for factions or voting patterns, one should use caution in reading too much into the way members vote on an issue especially when the vote is so lopsided. However, I observe that all of the Black members of the Council voted for the investigation, the four identified Republican members of the Council voted for the investigation. The two openly homosexual members of the Council voted against  the investigation. There was no pattern to the way female councilmen voted, some voted for the investigation and some against.

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Friday, February 9, 2018

How to impeach the mayor

by Rod Williams - The Metro Charter does not use the term "impeach" but it provides for removal from office by "ouster" or "recall."

To recall the mayor a petition must be signed by by 15% of the the qualified voters in Davidson County.  That would be a difficult number to achieve. There are about 420,000 registered voters in the County so a recall petition would require a petition signed by 63,000 voters. In the election of September, 2015 which elected Mayor Barry, there were 374,209 registered voters. Of that number, 110,894 voted in that election which was 29.63% of the eligible voters. Megan Barry received 60,519 votes. (I have requested the exact number of registered voters from the Election Commission and will update this post when provided with that information.)

A notice of the intention to obtain signatures for a recall petition must be filed with the metropolitan clerk prior to obtaining signatures of registered qualified voters and the required number of registered voters must be filed with the clerk no later than thirty days following the date the notice is filed. Once the petition is submitted, the Election Commission will verify the signatures. If the petition does contain a sufficient number of good names, then an election will be held to elect a successor.

The recall election would not be a yes or no vote on ousting Mayor Barry but would be an election. Mayor Barry's name would automatically be on the ballot along with others who qualify to run. Like any other election, the person getting the majority wins. If Mayor Barry should win she would continue to serve as mayor. If no one gets a majority, there would be a runoff. For more information on this, see the Metro Charter sections 15.05 thorough section 15.09.

Ouster is judicial process described in state law and is available to any municipality and the process is described in Tennessee Code Annotated, sections 8. A person may be removed from office "who shall knowingly or willfully commit misconduct in office," or who fails to perform their duties or is drunk in public or does a couple other things. 

The attorney general may initiate the ouster proceeding or may do so in response to a complaint, but it is up to the attorney general except when the governor directs the AG to start ouster proceedings. The AG may call witnesses and gather testimony and then he presents a case to a jury. If the defendant is found guilty, they are removed from office.

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Wednesday, February 7, 2018

What happened at the Feb. 6th Council meeting: investigating the mayor, Tax 4 Tracks with $8.9B price tag, even more $ for General Hospital.

 by Rod Williams - The council meeting of February 6th had lots of interesting discussion involving several very important issues. I will summarize those first. If you are going to actually watch the full meeting you need an agenda and the council staff analysis. Without a program you really will not know what is going on. To access the agenda, staff analysis and my commentary on the agenda, follow this link.

Council moves to investigate the mayor.
Resolution 1039 was a late resolution to investigate Mayor Barry and was approved by a roll call vote.
An objection from two members could have stopped the resolution from being considered. Several members speak in favor of the resolution stressing the obligation of the legislative branch of the government to protect the tax payers interest. Opponents argue that the TBI and other bodies are investigation the mayor and this investigation is unnecessary. Those arguments, I thought, were very lame and they were adequately countered. The motion required 30 votes to pass and got the sufficient number of votes. The investigation will be limited in scope and look at the issue of miss use of public funds. To watch the debate see time stamp 1:41:24 to 2:28:26. See a following post on this blog for the result of the roll call vote of 30 to 7.

Tax for Tracks passes, headed to referendum with a $8.9 Billion price tag language.

Bill BL2017-1031  passed on third and final reading to adopt  the Mayor's transit improvement program and place the plan on a May 1, 2018 ballot referendum. However, an amendment was passed that would add to the referendum verbiage that the real cost of the program was $8.952 billion. The vote on the transparency amendment was 21 in favor, 16 opposed and one abstention. I will post the result of the roll call vote in a following post on this blog.

The referendum will have voters decide on increases to not only the sales tax but three additional taxes. The four taxes to fund the project are these:
  • Increasing the sales tax rate from 9.25% to 9.75% in July 2018 and to 10.25% percent in 2023. This would be the highest sales tax rate in the nation.
  • A surcharge on the hotel-motel tax which by 2023 would be 6.375%, one of the highest in the nation.
  • A 20% surcharge added to the local car rental tax making that tax 1.2%.
  • A 20 percent increase in the city’s business and excise tax.
The bill passed by a vote of 34 in favor, 2 against and 2 abstentions. The two no votes came from council members Robert Swope and Holly Huezo. Council members Angie Henderson and Dave Rosenberg abstained from voting. The discussion is worth viewing. To view the discussion see timestamp 2:38:06 to 3:19:13 in the video. 

  
Even More money approved for General Hospital. $17,141,000.
Resolution RS2018-1032  which would appropriate an additional $13,231,000 to support General Hospital is substituted to increase the funding to $17.14 million. This is still short of the additional $19.7 million the hospital says it needs. The extra $3.9 million in the substitute is coming from the city's "undesignated fund balance," which serves as a rainy day fund for the city. Of the $13.2 million in the original resolution, $10.83 million comes from the undesignated fund balance of the General Fund and the remaining $2.4 million comes from impounded funds from six different expenditure accounts including an account for storm water management and an account to incentivize the construction of affordable housing. The total now to come out of the undesignated fund balance will reduce that fund balance to less than five percent of the city's general operating budget. This is irresponsible and will be the first time thus has happened in nearly a decade.

The substitute removes the hiring freeze called for in the original resolution and also calls for the creation of a strategic planning committee to consider the future of General Hospital. For a good understanding of this issue, you may want to watch the video and see staff attorney Jamison's explanation. For a deep understanding of this complicated issue you may want to watch the Budget and Finance Committee meeting of Monday where the Council spend three hours garbling with this issue and drafting the substitute. The Council approved the resolution as substituted by a vote of 36 in favor, none opposed and two abstentions. To view the discussion on the resolution see the video at timestamp 59.31 to 1:48:42.

Earlier this year, the mayor showed courage in proposing to change General Hospital from a hospital to an outpatient facility but then she buckled to pressure and retreated. Since that did not happen, if I were serving in the Council, I would have supported this resolution. Council has little choice but to spend this money. Until such time as we close General Hospital it will continue to be a drain on the city's resources. If kept open, it must pays its employees and pay its bills.

General Hospital has been a money pit for generations. In the last two years the Hospital has received $26 million in emergency funding in addition to a $35 million annual subsidy from the Metro Council.  As reported in The Tennessean recently, a recent audit found that the hospital, "failed at basic bookkeeping, unable to keep track of patient payments and major expenses."

While poor management is obviously a problem, the real problem with Nashville General is that  no one wants to go there.  Metro jail inmates without insurance needing hospitalization have no choice and are sent to General and there is a financial incentive for Metro employees to use General but it still cannot fill its beds. The facility is  licensed for 150 beds, staffed for 114 and has an average of 44 beds filled a day. Metro General should have been closed fifty years ago.  Ever since the advent of Medicaid there has been no need for a city charity hospital and the reason it has been kept open is purely political. There is no federal or state law or metro charter provision requiring the city to operate a charity hospital. The reason General Hospital is kept open is because it is a source of prestige for the Black community.

While this action puts a band-aid on the problem of General Hospital, the problem does not go away. This shifting of funding and dangerously dipping into the undesignated fund balance will complicate the upcoming development of a city budget. I fear the solution will be a tax increase.

There was another bill concerning General Hospital,  Bill BL2018-1055 on second reading which would protect General Hospital from being downgraded to an out patient facility only and would provide that  until June 30, 2019, the mayor may not terminate any agreement between Metro and the Metro Hospital Authority without prior approval of the Metro Council by resolution. This bill also passed, passing by a voice vote. While I would have reluctantly supported the resolution, if I had a vote, I would have opposed the bill.

In Other Council Action
Following the prayer and pledge, the first order of business is confirmation of mayoral appointments to boards and commissions. No surprises and no drama. One person withdrew his name from consideration and the others were approved. Bills on First Reading pass by a single vote without discussion as is the norm.

Public hearing on zoning and planning bills bore me, as I am sure they do most people not directly affected. I don't even try to form an opinion on each of these bills and zip though that part of the council meeting at double speed. I am calling attention to those that generated controversy or for some other reason I found of interest.
Resolution RS2018-999  is a resolution that approved a beer permit for an establishment that already has a liquor license.  This is for an establishment in Germantown. Concern is expressed that this will be a beer garden type establishment that will generate a lot of business and is out of character for the community. It is approved.
Bill BL2018-1043  is a bill disapproved by the Planning Commission to rezone property at 5200 Nolensville Pike in Councilman Davette Blalock's district. On final reading a disapproved bill requires 27 votes. Only one person speaks against it. There is a roll call vote of 26 in favor, 3 opposed and 6 abstentions.
Bill BL2018-1051  removes the Adult Entertainment Overlay for a bunch of parcels in Councilman O'Connel's district. The Planning Commission has approved the bill so apparently there are no legal problems with doing this. No one speaks on it and it passes.
There are 17 resolution on the agenda and they are all routine things such as accepting grants, paying settlements and approving of signs to overhang the right of way. These are the only two of interest:
Resolution RS2018-1022  spends $15.3 million out of the General Fund Reserve Fund (4% Fund) for various purchases for 15 departments. It includes $534,000 for Municipal Auditorium. With the large number of music venue's and sports facilities in town of various sizes, I question if the city still needs to be in the auditorium business. The bill is amended to take out the project that would fund the street salt bin relocation located in west Nashville over concern about the city's plan for the future use of that property. Apparently members of the Council were not consulted about this prior to the filing of the resolution. The resolution passes.

Resolution RS2018-1038 is a memorizing resolution requesting the Tennessee Department of Transportation to consider neighbors’ concerns and prioritize certain features during the improvements scheduled along Interstate 440.  Included in this resolution is a request that more sound barriers be build along 1-440. As I understand it, I-440 is to have an additional lane added going in both directions.  When I-440 was finally approved after being delayed for years it was supposed to be a "parkway." Originally trucks were not going to be allowed to use it, but that did not last long. In my view, no changes should be allowed to be made to I-440 without mitigating the effect of those changes to the neighborhoods though which this freeway passes. A resolution of this nature has no legal impact and just expresses an opinion. It passes on the consent agenda. 
 Bill BL2017-790 on second reading would revisit the issue of insurance benefits provided to previous members of the Metro Council.This is deferred one meeting.

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The Mayor Megan Barry scandal is national news

Living in Nashville and consuming local news one may not realize that the scandal involving Mayor Barry's affair with a subordinate and misuse of public funds to facilitate the affair is national news and even international news, but it is.  There is not much insight to be gained from reading about it in other newspapers, most are apparently just a repackaging of The Tennessean's reporting, but it is interesting to see the twist other outlets put on the story.  One source said it was like an episode of Nashville, the prime time soap opera. Others point out she is Nashville's first women mayor and her progressive politics. One source describe her as "one of the Democratic Party's brightest Southern stars."

The Story has been carried by AP, AOL.com, ABC, CNN, Fox News, The Washington Post, Fortune magazine,  and UK's Daily Mail. The Daily Mail story had several pictures and video clips. Here are some excerpts from other news sources carrying the story:

The New York Times: I Know That God Will Forgive Me,’ the Nashville Mayor Says. But Will the Voters?

Mayor Megan Barry, the first woman to lead this city, has been the kind of politician who seemed to effortlessly reflect the tenor of her place and time. Like others in booming Nashville, she is an ambitious transplant, socially liberal but business-friendly, a non-Southerner comfortable in a Southern context. It is a formula that has earned her poll numbers that would be the envy of any politician.

But in recent days, scandal has threatened to dim one of the Democratic Party’s brightest Southern stars.  ....

Hollywood Live: Megan Barry: 5 Things To Know About The Married Nashville Mayor Who Admitted To Having An Affair.

(more to come)

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Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Mayor's tax 4 tracks passes Council, headed to referendum w/$8.9B language

Bill BL2017-1031   on third reading to adopt  the Mayor's transit improvement program and requesting the Davidson County Election Commission to call a county-wide referendum election to be held on May 1, 2018 to approve the tax increases to support the program passed by a vote of 34 in favor, 2 against and 2 abstentions. However, an amendment was passed that would add to the referendum verbiage that the real cost of the program was $8.952 billion. The vote on the transparency amendment was 21 in favor, 16 opposed and one abstention.

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Metro Council votes to investigate Mayor Barry!

Resolution 1039 to investigate Mayor Barry was approved by a roll call vote. Watching live, I failed to get the exact vote tally, but it passed. Seven members voted "no" and none abstained. The motion required 30 votes to pass and got a sufficient number of votes. The investigation will be limited in scope and look at the issue of miss use of public funds.

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Metro Council approves to give $17M to Nashville General Hospital

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What's on the Council agenda for Feb. 6, 2018: Investigating the mayor's affair, tax for tracks, more $ for General Hospital.

By Rod Williams - The Metro Council will meet Tuesday, February 6, 2018 at 6:30 PM in the Council chamber at the Metro Courthouse. The hottest topic of the meetings is a resolution to launch a council investigation of Mayor Barry related to her affair and the apparent misuse of public funds to facilitate the affair. The other hot items is the mayor's transit program. There is also a bill to spend more money on General Hospital. If you are going to watch the Council meeting, you need a copy of the Council agenda and the staff analysis  or you really will not know what is going on. You can get the agenda and analysis at the highlighted links.

Investigating the Mayor

Romantic Greece - three days and nothing to do.
The item to generate most interest at the Tuesday, February 6th meeting is not on the agenda but will be a  late resolution filed by Budget and Finance Committee chairman Tanaka Vercher to appoint a committee of three to seven council members to oversee the investigation of Mayor Megan Barry. The focus of the investigation would be a determination if the sexual relationship between Barry and her head of the security detail, Sgt. Foster, involved violating Metro travel policy and would include a  review of overtime pay earned by Sgt. Rob Forrest.

The resolution will call on the Vice Mayor to appoint the committee's members. The committee would have the authority to subpoena witnesses and compel them to testify under oath. This charter provision authorizing such an investigation has never been used. Since the resolution is a late resolution it will require suspension of the rules to be considered. The sponsor will get to state the reason for considering a late resolution but that motion to introduce a late resolution is not debatable. It takes only two votes to deny the resolution being considered.  If it is blocked, it will be on the agenda for the February 20th council meeting.  If considered it would require 30 votes to be adopted. I suspect at least two members will vote to block it.

The mayor's tax for tracks plan
Bill BL2017-1031   on third reading is the bill to adopt  the Mayor's transit improvement program and requesting the Davidson County Election Commission to call a county-wide referendum election to be held on May 1, 2018 to approve the tax increases to support the program.

As expected, this passed when on second reading. Also when on second reading it  was amended to modify the language of the referendum. The current language will make the plan more attractive by distorting the facts. It was amended to require that the language of the referendum not say that the vote is a vote increasing the sales tax to 10.25% but instead to say the vote is a vote to increase the local option sales tax to 3.25%. While that is technically correct it is deceptive. The vote by the public in referendum will be increasing only the local option, not the state sales tax. However, when the public votes on this, if they they vote for the referendum, they will be voting to raise the total sales tax to 10.25%,  making Nashville's sales tax the highest in the nation. I bet most people could not tell you which portion of the sales tax is state and which is local. The deceptive language was approved by a voice vote with some audible "no's"when on second.

When on second reading Councilman Cooper proposed an amendment that would require that the public referendum language state that the project would cost $8.952 billion. The referendum was to state that the project is a $5 billion project. The  $8.952 billion figure is a figure stated in the project plan and is the estimated cost of the plan over the 15-year construction period. The $5 billion dollar figure is some of the cost expressed in current dollars.  Cooper's amendment failed and the language of the referendum will use the deceptive lower figure of $5 billion. That is what is before the body.

Cooper's amendment would have also revealed the amount of the total sales tax if the referendum is approved instead of just the local share of the total which is 3.25%. His amendment would have had the referendum state the local option would increase to 3.25% for a total sales tax rate of 10.25%. Cooper's amendment was tabled by a vote of 21 in favor of tabling, 14 against, one abstention and three not voting. The bill was then voted on and passes by a vote of 30 to 5.

To better understand the bill, see page 13-21 of the staff analysis.  Also for more information see this link and this link.  To view the Council debate when the bill was on second reading see the video at timestamp  43:28 to 1:10:47 at this link.


While I think the odds favor this bill passing, I do not think that is assured.  One reason is that the mayor has been weakened by the recent scandal involving her sexual affair with an employee and the misuse of public funds to facilitate that affair. She has lost influence. Another reason is that President Trump has revealed more details of his proposed infrastructure plan and we can no longer assume that $1.5 billion will come from the federal government (link). That now seems highly unlikely. Also, people are just now becoming aware of the negatives regarding this plan and some of the opposition may reach council members.

In a previous post I had erroneously stated that in order to pass the bill required two-thirds vote of the body which is 27 votes. Actually, it requires only a simply majority of the votes cast.  I was relying on what I thought I knew and did not look it up.  I regret the error.

State law requires the proposed ballot language to be approved 75 to 90 days prior to a scheduled referendum election, so the February 6, 2018 Council meeting would be the latest meeting at which the ordinance could be adopted for a May 1, 2018 referendum election.  If not acted upon, then the next opportunity for a public referendum would by August which will be a more important election with greater turn out and will lessen the likelihood that the plan would be approved in referendum.
 
More money for General Hospital and protecting General
Resolution RS2018-1032  would appropriate an additional $13,231,000 from the General Fund to support General Hospital. This has to come from the General Fund not the 4% reserve fund. The 4% fund can only be used for equipment purchases and repairs. In the past the Council has been able to constantly give more and more money to our failing charity hospital without it hurting.  This time, we are out of money and in order to fund this subsidy the city has to take money from other places.  One of those places is the fund that was to incentivize private developers to build affordable housing. Instead of taking money from other places the city could draw down more money in the general fund but this would be poor money management and probably result in a lowering of the city's bond rating.

General Hospital has been a money pit for generations. In the last two years the Hospital has received $26 million in emergency funding in addition to a $35 million annual subsidy from the Metro Council.  As reported in The Tennessean recently, a recent audit found that the hospital, "failed at basic bookkeeping, unable to keep track of patient payments and major expenses."

While poor management is obviously a problem, the real problem with Nashville General is that  no one wants to go there.  Metro jail inmates without insurance needing hospitalization have no choice and are sent to General and there is a financial incentive for Metro employees to use General but it still cannot fill its beds. The facility is  licensed for 150 beds, staffed for 114 and has an average of 44 beds filled a day. Metro General should have been closed fifty years ago.  Ever since the advent of Medicaid there has been no need for a city charity hospital and the reason it has been kept open is purely political. There is no federal or state law or metro charter provision requiring the city to operate a charity hospital. The reason General Hospital is kept open is because it is a source of prestige for the Black community.

Earlier this year, the mayor showed courage in proposing to change General Hospital from a hospital to an outpatient facility but then she buckled to pressure and retreated.  Since this supplemental funding bill requires taking money from other programs, there may be push back but really the Council has little choice but to spend this money. Until such time as we close General Hospital it will continue to be a drain on the city's resources. If kept open, it must pays its employees and pay its bills.

There is another bill concerning General Hospital,  Bill BL2018-1055 on second reading which would protect General Hospital from being downgraded to an out patient facility only and would provide that  until June 30, 2019, the mayor may not terminate any agreement between Metro and the Metro Hospital Authority without prior approval of the Metro Council by resolution.This is very disappointing. This bill needs to be defeated. I am very disappointing to see that Councilman Steve Glover is one of the sponsors of this bill.

Other agenda items:

There are 17 mayoral appointees to Boards and Commission on the agenda for confirmation and as always they will be affirmed.

There  is one resolution and 17 bills on public hearing.  Items on public hearings are all rezoning bills or related to planning and zoning policy.  Rezoning hearings bore me and I don't even try to form an opinion on the merits each rezoning bill before the Council.  Rezoning bills usually are of interest only to people who live near the proposed rezoning. People who don't care one way or the other do not show up and with rare exceptions the only people who speak in favor of rezoning bills are those who will benefit from the rezoning such as the property owner or the developer.  Opponents always make the same argument which boils down to one of these: 1) the change will result in stressing the infrastructure such as too much traffic on the roadway or overcrowd the schools, 2) will cause flooding, and 3) will change for the worse the character of the community. If you are interested in knowing what is permitted in different zoning districts, follow this link. I call attention to only those bills on public hearing that for some reason I expect to be controversial or to bills which have been disapproved by the Planning Commission. A bill disapproved by the Planning Commission requires 27 votes to be approved on third and final reading and sometimes that can be difficult to obtain.

There are 38 bills on first reading. First reading is a formality that gets bills on the agenda and they are not considered by committee until after they pass first reading.  Normally bills on First Reading are all lumped together and pass by a single vote. It is rare that a bill on First Reading is voted on separately. I normally do not read bills until they get to second reading.

There are 17 resolution on the agenda and all are on the consent agenda at this time. A resolution stays on the consent agenda if it passes  unanimously the committees to which it was assigned. Resolutions which receive negative votes in committee are pulled off of consent. Also any councilman may have a resolution pulled off of consent. Those remaining on consent are lumped together and passed by a single vote. Resolutions on the consent agenda are usually not controversial and tend to be routine matters, such as accepting grants from the Federal or State Government, entering into inter agency agreements over mundane things, appropriating money from the 4% fund, settling lawsuits, or approving signs overhanging the sidewalk. Unlike a bill which requires three votes of the Council to pass, a resolution only requires one vote of the Council.

Below are additional items of interest:
Bill BL2018-1043  on pubic hearing is disapproved bill to rezone property at 5200 Nolensville Pike in Councilman Davette Blalock's district.

Bill BL2018-1051  on public hearing would remove the Adult Entertainment Overlay for a bunch of parcels in Councilman O'Connel's district. The Planning Commission has approved the bill so apparently there are no legal problems with doing this.  No one wants a strip club in their community but while they can be regulated, they cannot be banned. The staff analysis does not review this bill and I have no specific insight on this but am simply calling attention to it. Zoning cannot be used as a means for banning an activity people do not like. Nashville has pretty much regulated strip clubs out of existence. At one time, Nashville had dozens of such establishments but now only a handful of tame clubs remain. If this bill has the effect of making it impossible for a strip club to find a location to operate, then it may result in legal challenges. I am not an attorney and there may be no problem but again there may be, I don't know.

Resolution RS2018-1022  spends $15.3 million out of the General Fund Reserve Fund (4% Fund) for various purchases for 15 departments. This is nothing out of the ordinary and I assume the Mayor's office and the Council's Budget and Finance committee do their job and all of this spending is proper.  One expenditure I hopes gets close scrutiny is $534,000 for Municipal Auditorium. With the large number of music venue's and sports facilities in town of various sizes, I question if the city still needs to be in the auditorium business.

Resolution RS2018-1038 is a memorizing resolution requesting the Tennessee Department of Education to consider neighbors’ concerns and prioritize certain features during the improvements scheduled along Interstate 440.  Included in this resolution is a request that more sound barriers be build along 1-440. As I understand it, I-440 is to have an additional lane added going in both directions.  When I-440 was finally approved after being delayed for years it was supposed to be a "parkway." Originally trucks were not going to be allowed to use it, but that did not last long. In my view, no changes should be allowed to be made to I-440 without mitigating the effect of those changes to the neighborhoods though which this freeway passes.

 Bill BL2017-790 on second reading would revisit the issue of benefits provided to previous members of the Metro Council. Former Metro Council members get a very generous benefit in the form of lifetime metro insurance at the same rate as a retired metro employee. In the interest of full disclosure, I get this benefit myself.  I do not thing we should.  At the time this was awarded, there were no term limits and usually council members served for a long time and there were few former council members and council members tended to be older when they left office. It did not cost a lot. Now, there are lots of former council members.  This was last before the Council in July 2017 and at that time was deferred indefinitely at the recommendation of the committees which considered the bill. To consider this bill the Council would have to vote to override the previous committee recommendations. That is not likely to happen in which case, the bill must permanently be removed from the agenda.

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Mayor Megan Barry routinely traveled without security prior to affair, records show

The Tennessean: Mayor Megan Barry routinely traveled without security prior to affair, records show

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Proposed new amendment to Mayors Tax for Tracks plan would reveal $8.95 billion price tag.

Tonight there will be an amendment offered to the  Mayor's transit improvement program that  calls for a county-wide referendum election to be held on May 1, 2018 to approve the tax increases to support the program. The amendment would  change the wording of the referendum to reveal that the real cost of the program is estimated to require $8.95 billion in revenue through 2032. Currently, the ballot wording would only reveal the plan's $5.4 billion in capital costs expressed in current dollars. This amendment has the support of all five of the Council at-large members.  While this isn't much it is something and will help make the referendum more difficult to pass. The referendum would still hide the fact that it would increase the Nashville sales tax to 10.2% making Nashville the city with the nations highest sales tax.

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Mayor Barry recommended city job for daughter of officer with whom she had affair

The Tennessean: Mayor Barry recommended city job for daughter of officer with whom she had affair

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Council Budget Committee recommends increase in Nashville General Hospital. Funds $17.1 instead of the mayor's $13.2.

by Rod Williams - Mayor Barry proposed giving General Hospital an additional $13.2 million and last night the Metro's Budget and Finance Committee by vote of 12 to 0 upped that amount to $17.1 million. This is still short of the additional $19.7 million the hospital says it needs.

The extra $3.9 is coming from the city's "undesignated fund balance," which serves as a rainy day fund for the city. Spending this money will reduce that fund balance to less than five percent of the city's general operating budget. This is irresponsible and will be the first time thus has happened in nearly a decade. With the city awash in money, this should not be happening. Our current budget is $2.2 billion dollars which is $122 million more than the year prior. The size of the reserve fund is one of the factors bonding agency look at in giving the city a bonding rating. A drop in our bond rating could be very costly to the city. Look for a tax increase next year.

If this additional $17.1 million is not enough for General, I do not know where the city will get the rest of the money. We could dip even deeper into the undesignated fund balance, but surely the Council would not be even more financially irresponsible.  There are various other funds the council could dip into, a little here and a little there, and by delaying a planned hiring or expansion or facility opening, here and there, the the city could find the money without a lot of pain but that is not a good practice. The city could take some money from departments and then let the department use the 4% fund to purchase equipment instead of spending the money out of their budgeted amount as originally planned. This tactic sometimes involves stretching the definition of what the 4% fund is to be used for, however. I have observed the Council a long time and have seen this "robbing Peter to pay Paul" used successfully in the past. It is doable but not a good practice. Look for a tax increase next year.

I think the Council should have gotten behind the mayor and given her some backbone to go ahead and convert General to an out patient facility, but they did not.  Since the Council does not have the fortitude to do the right thing and close General, then they might as well give it the money it request. If we are going to keep General unchanged, they must pay their bills. We will then have to increase taxes or cut spending going forward next year. Of course a "cut" really means not an increase so some departments will get less of an increase than they otherwise would have. It is a fact just as it is in a household budget, if you spend money on one thing, then you can't spend it on something else.

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Monday, February 5, 2018

The Tennessean editorial: Megan Barry betrayed Nashville.

The Tennessean editorial: Megan Barry betrayed Nashville.

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No Tax 4 Tracks: How can you do your part?



Nashville's debt load is bigger than ever, and Nashville taxpayers could soon be on the hook for a $9 billion transit plan that won't solve our most pressing transportation needs. 

If we don't fight this proposal... 
  1. Nashville will have the highest sales tax in the Nation, matching Chicago at 10.25%
  2. More than $9 billion taxpayer dollars will be completely wasted on outdated 19th Century Railroads which will be constructed right in the middle of our busiest streets. 
  3. Nashville will be bypassed by the Revolution in New Transit Technologies providing better and cheaper and MORE popular alternatives. 
For all these reasons, we MUST fight this plan.  How can you do your part?
  • Yard Signs - First, get a yard sign for yourself and then ask your Friends, Family and Neighbors to send an email to: yardsign@notax4tracks.com. Include the street address and we will deliver and set-up a yard sign ASAP. 
  • Invite a speaker to your club or group - Have a group of neighbors or a service club that would like to hear more on the issue? Just let us know at info@notax4tracks.com and we can arrange for a NoTax4Tracks speaker to present the case.
  • SHOW YOUR PASSION to friends and family about this very critical issue. Politics can be contentious these days but this is a pocketbook issue which crosses party lines and will affect every family budget in Nashville for decades to come. For a price tag of $9 billion, Metro Nashville is effectively spending over $13,000 per person in Nashville.  And if recent Metro construction projects are any evidence, expect costs to balloon even further (Sounds Stadium exploded to $91 million after Mayor's office budgeted $65 million). We have seen this in many other cities. Even though transit agencies are losing ridership nationwide, their "solution" is ALWAYS higher taxes and a larger staff.
  • Register to VOTE - Make sure you're registered to vote in advance of the May 1 referendum!  You can now easily register online at GoVoteTN.com.
We need a comprehensive transportation solution, but we deserve a plan that doesn't take away lanes from our busiest roads, that doesn't significantly add to our tax burden and debt (and could potentially lead to further downgrading of Metro Nashville bond ratings) and isn't relying on nearly $2 billion in federal funds that may not come through. 

Join us in saying no to more taxes, more debt, and a failing transit plan. 

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Sunday, February 4, 2018

Sign the Petition calling for Mayor Megan Barry to Resign

A PETITION FROM THE RESIDENTS OF DAVIDSON COUNTY

We, the undersigned residents of Davidson County, Tennessee, state that, based on evident facts which have recently come to light, it is wholly appropriate under the rights accorded to free people under a free government that we protest the fact that:
1. A relationship of a sexual nature has existed between the Mayor of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County and a member of her protection detail (which is furnished at the expense of Davidson County taxpayers by the Metropolitan Police Department) for a period of many months. During this relationship, overtime pay accrued by this officer has skyrocketed compared to that earned by him while serving in the protection detail under previous mayors.

2. During this relationship, the amount of overnight travel billed by the mayor’s office to the taxpayers has likewise increased significantly, which certainly gives an appearance of taxpayer funding being used to further this relationship.

3. The relationship was, regardless of consent, a workplace relationship between a person in a high position of authority and a person of lesser rank directly subordinate to the mayor. This sort of relationship which, when brought to light in the context of private businesses, almost inevitably results in the resignation or forced termination of the parties involved, and at the very least the person in the position of authority.
We feel that our government, with its power to extract our money involuntarily by means of taxation, should be held to no lower standard than a private business which we could voluntarily choose to patronize.


Therefore, we call on Megan Barry to resign immediately from the office of Mayor of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, so that the stigma which now exists can be removed from that office, so that the business of the county can resume being administered on a straightforward basis, and that the investigation of this potential abuse of the public’s money can be conducted in an atmosphere of the utmost honesty, without fear or favor.

To sign the petition follow this link

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